Reforestation is the most effective measure against climate change.

In autumn 2019, a study by ETH Zurich found that nothing fights climate change as effectively as the reforestation of trees. According to calculations, new forests could bind two thirds of man-made CO2 emissions – in this way, the goal set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees could be achieved. But for an effective forest to be created in the long term, the steps are necessary – and they are not just done on the side. On this page we will be happy to show you which steps are necessary to create a complete forest.

Reforestation is the most effective measure against climate change.

In autumn 2019, a study by ETH Zurich found that nothing fights climate change as effectively as the reforestation of trees. According to calculations, new forests could bind two thirds of man-made CO2 emissions – in this way, the goal set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees could be achieved. But for an effective forest to be created in the long term, the steps are necessary – and they are not just done on the side. On this page we will be happy to show you which steps are necessary to create a complete forest.

 

Located in the most beautiful places: Our reforestation areas.

Your forests are in Schleswig-Holstein, between the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. Near Welmbüttel, for example, north-east of Meldorf: 105 hectares designated as a nature conservation area. Or in Lehmkuhlen, a municipality that borders the town of Preetz to the east, right in the middle of the northern foothills in the Schleswig-Holstein hilly landscape of Schleswig-Holstein.

 

Would you like to take over a forest sponsorship in one of our reforestation areas? Then you are more than welcome to contact us. You will then receive a corresponding confirmation in the form of an Evers ReForest forest sponsorship certificate.

Step by step: The stages of work up to the forest.

Preparing the Ground and Fencing

Before planting can even begin, the entire area to be stocked must be fenced. The young saplings are on the menus of many types of animals and must be protected accordingly by enclosing the area. Once the soil has been prepared, planting follows. 7,000 to 8,000 seedlings per hectare are planted semi-automatically. Planting this number of trees and spacing ensure that tree growth is primarily upwards and not outward. When broadleaf trees like oaks are planted, this close spacing also promotes the process of “rejuvenation”.

Growth and Care in the Juvenile Phase

During the first year, the root system is established. Definite growth is not yet observable. As of the second year, the saplings are acclimatized, and a strong growth spurt takes place. To achieve optimum development, annual care is also necessary. Undergrowth (grasses, shrubs, etc.) must be reduced or removed, for example, by cutting. This give the tree more room and provides it with better access to light and water. At the end of the juvenile stage, the trees have then reached a height of between 2 and 4 m, depending on the type of tree.

Thinning during the Flowering Phase

The term thinning (care of the young plantation) stands for all methods used to look after the stand following the juvenile phase. This includes the selective removal of all expendable, badly shaped (twin stems, twisted or coarsely branched), diseased or damaged tree growth. The object is to promote as much good stock as possible by removing the bad.